Transformer Kit

Tesla72
  • Submitted By: Tesla72
  • Category: Power
  • Submitted: May 15, 2012
Transformer Kit

The most simple idea that you never see in any store: The ability to build a transformer tailor-made for your needs from a simple kit of a core and a length of wire. You would simply need to choose how big the core needs to be, the gauge of wire, and how many pins for soldering the inputs & outputs. An optional center tap could also be used as a variable.

COMMENTS

user
pcjunky (Jun 06, 2012)

Been winding my own inductors for a couple of years now. Save all those bad PC power supplies. They have a wealth of components. Lots of torrid cores. Use a simple cheap LCR meter to measure inductance. Transformers would not be that much harder.

user
Hunter (May 31, 2012)

Boy, I am torn on this one. I too have been frustrated over the years by the need for project specific transformers that simply weren't readily available and would have happily purchased a "kit" if I thought it would have fit the bill, but sadly there is no single magic core that is right for every situation. If the idea is that Jameco create a kit like their resistor (PN: 81832), capacitor (PN: 81867) or logic (PN: 84961) kits and the "Inductor kit" came with numerous cores and several sizes of wire along with detailed information and practical examples about each core, then I think this is a GREAT idea, if the idea is to simply sell a single core and have the user source the wire then I can't see it being viable. How would you proceed if this brief were approved? My suggestion would be to find a transformer MFG willing to help select cores and design tools from their existing line. It would likely need to be broken down into a couple of different actual kits like "Signal Transformers", "Small and Medium Power Inductors" and "Large Power Inductors". I would think the most important part of such a kit would be application notes and software. Without easy to use design tools the DIYer is going to have a difficult time getting good results.

user
tjmedina2001 (May 30, 2012)

I kinda agree that this may lack the true kit form. It sounds more like you are suggesting a system of customers ordering custom transformers with some assembly required. There are companies that will build custom transformers to your specs (Custom Coils is one of them).

user
gatech (May 17, 2012)

I'm confused. How is this a kit?

user
Tesla72 (May 17, 2012)
Its a kit because modern transformers are usually so small that you cant unwind them. what if you need an EXACT amount of power for a project?

this idea was actually born out of my own frustration with having to wind my own coils out of random objects or take apart those very expensive ones from an online store. with this method, you could simply pick your wire gauges (and i did suggest that in my submission) and you get a nice fresh transformer core ready to be used.
user
gatech (May 17, 2012)

To be more specific: If you have to separately purchase the wire size you need, and the core size/shape you need, what exactly would be included in the kit?

user
Tesla72 (May 19, 2012)
The idea is to streamline the process more than anything. the kit would give you a core of a large enough size that you could work with it using your hands and a length of wire of a medium gauge. this way you can build most transformers you would need from just the included parts. this way most peoples needs are met with the included parts alone and those building a "really " special transformer would at least have a starting point.
user
Resonantman (May 22, 2012)

If you don't want to use particle science,that fine .The On the Job Training of hands on projects elevates your thinking of why some smart people think like this,and Tesla ,Morey,

user
user ClubRob (May 16, 2012)

Does anybody know a good place where you can buy magnetic cores alone?

user
EinarA (May 16, 2012)
To reply to 'Rob, Digikey has a selection of toroid cores. On Tesla's idea: I made a number of small transformers ( and one med sized one )back in the 70's when you could still find ones you could take apart without ruining them; the whole thing was basiclly held together with a tacky wax. Making a power trans this way was a lot of tedius work even after I built a winding jig. This could work if they came with a prewound primary. Since everyone would need a different amount of diferent guage of wire you would have to sell it seperately.
user
Tesla72 (May 17, 2012)
In response to EinarA: I suggested that the wire gauges be user selected, they almost have to be unless you want to constrain them to a very small range.
user
Paladin1956 (May 27, 2012)

Also. It doesn't have to be a power transformer. There a plenty of applications for high voltage and RF transformers. (AKA Tesla)

user
wbeaty (Jun 08, 2012)

This might be more like "science fair" educational than actually useful, but I find that large ferrite filters, those half-tubes that clamp around coax cables, work fine as transformer cores. Not for 120V line stepdown, but for little switching power supplies. Wind coils of #35 gauge directly on the halves, then clamp 'em together. Example: replace the 22V batt in ancient VT geiger counter by stepping up 3VDC filament supply using CMOS inverter oscillator at 50KHz. I don't see that Jameco sells them, but here's one from Goldmine: http://goo.gl/hJBew